Livros e Apostilas de Astronomia

Telescópios ... Página 7

Lawrence Harris, "So You Want a Meade LX Telescope!: How to Select and Use the LX200 and Other High-End Models (Patrick Moore's Practical Astronomy Series)"
Publisher: Springer | ISBN 10: 1441917748 | 2010 | PDF | 191 pages | 8.4 MB

The Meade LX200 series of telescopes was introduced in 1992 and represented a giant step forward in technology for amateur astronomers - computer control. The LX200 series telescopes were an instant success and have outsold all other astronomical telescopes put together. Steady development has continued to the present day, and LX200s are available in a range of apertures from 8-inch through the giant 16-inch, which is widely installed in university astronomy departments and the smaller public observatories. For anyone considering buying a high-end Meade telescope, the book offers an experienced user's guide to what can actually be achieved with it.

So You Want a Meade LX Telescope also provides detailed discussions about some of the many software packages available to aid optimizing and actually using the scope. The typical results are discussed so readers can know what to expect. Also reviewed are essential accessories such as CCD cameras and the latest Active Optics units.

These extraordinary telescopes are capable of amazing results, but using them and setting them up can be a chore. That's why this book is essential reading for anyone who has bought or upgraded to an LX200 or its top-of-the-range companion, the RCS400 (later re-designated the LX400ACF).

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Observing the Sun with Coronado Telescopes By Philip Pugh

Publisher: Spri nger 2007 | 326 Pages | ISBN: 0387681264 | PDF | 209 MB

The Sun provides amateur astronomers with one of the few opportunities for daytime astronomy.
In order to see the major features of our nearest star, special telescopes that have a very narrow visible bandwidth are essential. The bandwidth has to be as narrow as 1 × 10-10 m (1 Angstrom) and centred on the absorption line of neutral hydrogen. This makes many major features of the Sun’s chromosphere visible to the observer. Such narrow-band "Fabry-Perot etalon filters" are high technology, and until the introduction of the Coronado range of solar telescopes, were too expensive for amateur use. The entry-level Coronado telescope, the PST (Personal Solar Telescope) costs under $500.

Solar prominences (vast columns of plasma, best seen at the edge of the solar disk), filaments, flares, sunspots, plage and active regions are all visible and can be imaged to produce spectacular solar photographs. Philip Pugh has assembled a team of contributors who show just how much solar work can be done with Coronado telescopes, and explain how to get the best from these marvellous instruments.

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Amateur Telescope Making in the Internet Age: Finding Parts, Getting Help, and More (Patrick Moore's Practical Astronomy Series)

Springer; 1st Edition. edition (October 1, 2010) | ISBN: 1441964142 | 204 pages | PDF | 2 MB

Building an astronomical telescope offers the amateur astronomer an exciting challenge, with the possibility of ending up with a far bigger and better telescope than could have been afforded otherwise. In the past, the starting point has always been the grinding and polishing of at least the primary mirror, a difficult and immensely time-consuming process. But now that the Internet has brought us together in a global village, purchasing off-the-shelf goods such as parabolic mirrors, eyepieces, lenses, and telescope tubes, is possible. There are also a vast number of used mirrors and lenses out there, and it is now possible to track them down almost anywhere in the world.

Online stores and auction houses have facilitated commerce regarding all sorts of useful optical components at a reasonable price. This is a book about making telescopes from available parts. It provides guidance on where to look and what to look for in selecting items useful for telescope making and explains how to assemble these components to produce an excellent instrument on a tight budget. At one time, many amateurs made their own telescopes from home-made parts. In today's rushed world, that has almost become a lost art.

The Internet offers a wonderful alternative to either buying a pricey scope fully assembled or making your own from scratch.

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Choosing and Using a Refracting Telescope (Patrick Moore's Practical Astronomy Series)

Springer; 1st Edition. edition (September 29, 2010) | ISBN: 1441964029 | 284 pages | PDF | 15 MB

Choosing and Using a Refracting Telescope has been written for the many amateur astronomers who already own, or are intending to purchase, a refracting telescope – perhaps to complement their existing arsenal of larger reflecting telescopes – or for the specialist who requires a particular refractor for serious astronomical applications or nature studies.

Four hundred year ago, during the winter of 1609, a relatively unknown Italian scientist, Galileo Galilei designed a spyglass with two crude lenses and turned it skyward. Since then, refractors have retained their dominance over all types of reflector in studies of the Moon, planets and double stars because of the precision of their optics and lack of a central obstruction in the optical path, which causes diffraction effects in all commercially-made reflectors.

Most mature amateur astronomers got started with a 60mm refractor, or something similar. Thirty years ago, there was little choice available to the hobbyist, but in the last decade long focus crown-flint achromats have moved aside for some exquisitely crafted apochromatic designs offered by leading commercial manufacturers. There has been a huge increase in the popularity of these telescopes in the last few years, led by a significant increase in the number of companies (particularly, William Optics, Orion USA, StellarVue, SkyWatcher and AstroTech) who are now heavily marketing refractors in the amateur astronomical magazines.

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Neale Monks, "Go-To Telescopes Under Suburban Skies"
Springer | 2010 | ISBN: 1441968504 | 260 pages | PDF | 2,9 MB

Go-To Telescopes Under Suburban Skies is the first book specifically written for amateur astronomers who own, or who are about to purchase, a computer-controlled ‘go-to’ telescope. Computer control and automatic location of objects in the night sky is now a feature of even inexpensive astronomical telescopes (under $200), no longer just of the more expensive models. The advantage of the ‘go-to’ capability is enormous – the telescope can be aimed at any object in the sky with great speed and accuracy – and so is the popularity of these instruments.

GO-TO Telescopes Under Suburban Skies provides literally hundreds more targets beyond those offered by the built-in ‘nightly tours’ that feature on the telescope’s computer handset (a feature incorporated by most manufacturers). Although most ‘go-to’ telescopes have enormous databases of objects they can find – usually running into tens of thousands – the tours (that’s suggested objects to look at) are always very limited. Once you’ve seen the planets and bright objects that the computer suggests, you’re on your own…

This new book answers the question, ‘What shall I observe next?’ in a way that is unique to ‘go-to’ telescopes. Unlike all existing books on deep sky observing, GO-TO Telescopes Under Suburban Skies doesn't waste space on RA/Dec co-ordinates or Star Maps and Finder Charts for suggested objects. It is designed expressly to be used alongside a ‘go-to’ telescope, using the NGC and SAO menus on the computer handset to quickly slew the telescope to each new target. This is unique, and makes the book much more information-rich than other observing guides.

Targets are arranged by season to maximise the chances of a given object being visible at the time of observing, and then are divided into four categories: three deep sky categories of increasing difficulty, and then one category of stars that covers things like coloured stars, multiple stars, and loose clusters/streams. The reader can quickly turn to the relevant season, and then work through the list of objects.

All existing books about practical deep-sky observing are biased towards non-‘go-to’ telescope owners and usually assume large-aperture instruments and/or dark, rural or desert skies. This book makes the more realistic assumption that the amateur astronomer has a relatively small telescope and is observing from a backyard in a suburban area.

Instead of devoting page after page to maps and co-ordinates, GO-TO Telescopes Under Suburban Skies leaves the computer to locate targets by using NGC and SAO catalog numbers, and so has the space to suggest many more fascinating deep-sky targets and provide detailed observing lists and information about what's being viewed.

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Peter Grego, David Mannion, "Galileo and 400 Years of Telescopic Astronomy (Astronomers' Universe)"

Publisher: Springer | 2010 | ISBN 1441955704 | PDF | 170 pages | 15.4 MB

In 1609 Galileo first used his telescope to kick start the science of observational astronomy - an event that proved to be of enormous historic, scientific, and cultural importance. Galileo and 400 Years of Telescopic Astronomy will feature the life and achievements of Galileo, around which has pivoted the story of four centuries of telescopic astronomy. The book will detail how astronomy has progressed through four centuries and contain glimpses of future space research and astronomy goals. Uniquely, interwoven with the text will be a range of practical projects for backyard astronomers in which to participate, projects that serve to illustrate many of Galileo's scientific discoveries.

Imagine yourself living 400 years ago, right before the telescope was first used by Galileo to look up into the skies and find unforeseen wonders. You probably believed, with most of the known world, that Earth was at the center of the magnificent parade of planets and stars above you, and the Sun’s purpose in journeying across the sky was to give Earth daylight and warmth. Suddenly, though, your world is turned upside down. The Church, all powerful in its doctrines and teachings of the times, continues to support theories that don’t fit the facts presented by scientists. Scientists in their quest for truth must hide their findings or risk the harsh penalties imposed by the Church. We have gone from a comforting Earth-centered universe to a tiny floating spec in a gigantic cosmos, barely a comma in a lengthy treatise.

And we have gone there in a blink of an eye. We may have lost our central position in the universe, but Grego and Mannion show us how much we have gained in understanding the universe around us. And we are only at the beginning of our journey. Their words help us to discover our place again and how we got there and what we might expect to learn in the centuries to come.

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